SIGHTSEEING

Hong Kong is a city full of excitement born out of a convergence of Asian and Western cultures, with great surprises and delights on offer to tourists at every turn. Every district in Hong Kong exudes a distinct character with their unique dining experiences, cultural activities, heritage sites, historic attractions, outdoor activities, as well as shopping venues for tourists to discover, explore and indulge in.

Tourist Apps and e-Guides

Shopping

Hong Kong is a great place to shop, and there are plenty of retail opportunities and venues to suit all budgets, tastes and ages.

Discover Hong Kong – Where to Shop

Hong Kong Outdoors

Hong Kong is a foodie’s paradise, with some 14,000 restaurants dishing up an array of cuisines from all over China, the rest of Asia and the world. You can explore the best the city has to offer, from its local dai pai dong (street stalls) and cha chaan teng (Hong Kong-style tea houses) to its fine dining restaurants. See below for more detailed information.

Discover Hong Kong – What to Eat

The Michelin Guide Hong Kong

Cultural Heritage and Historical Attractions

Taoist temples and Edwardian edifices nestle between skyscrapers, people trade on international markets and light incense to bodhisattvas, vestiges of Chinese clan heritage and European colonial history sit side by side — discover the cultural contrasts that have shaped Hong Kong. See below for recommendations for each district.

Discover Hong Kong – Culture and Heritage

Hong Kong Outdoors

Although Hong Kong is a densely populated city, its developed area only takes up 25 percent of the territory, leaving 40% of land to country parks and nature reserves. Hong Kong’s unspoiled territory teems with beaches, mountains, city and nature parks and outlying islands criss-crossed with hiking trails and cycling paths, allowing tourists to enjoy the natural scenery of the city.

Discover Hong Kong – Great Outdoors

The Hong Kong Trail

Recommendations by districts

Hong Kong Island and outlying islands

Hong Kong University

The University Museum and Art Gallery is located at 94 Bonham Road which sits on the southern edge of the University campus. Check out the exhibition at the time of your visit and go in to see the beautiful architecture and what is happening inside.

On 50 Kotewall Road there is the Lung Fu Shan Environmental Education Centre which was established jointly by The University of Hong Kong and the Environmental Protection Department in 2008 to promote through exhibitions, tours and workshops sustainability practice. The Centre is located near the entrance of a nature trail which takes you up to the Peak in an hour’s time for a panoramic view of Hong Kong.

Central District

Hong Kong Monetary Authority Information Centre

  • Address: 7/F Pedder Building 12 Pedder Street Central, Hong Kong

Locals with a Hong Kong identity card and visitors with passports can go up to the Information Centre which contains a research library and exhibition areas related to Hong Kong’s currency, fiscal policy and banking history. There are guided tours at 2.30pm Monday to Friday, and 10.30am on Saturday.  Apart from getting to know a few things about Hong Kong’s development as a financial hub, you can also see Hong Kong from above the clouds when it sometimes gets foggy or stormy in June.

Art in Hong Kong

There are many world famous galleries showcasing some of the best artworks created by artists around the world:

Gagosian Hong Kong

  • Address: 7/F Pedder Building 12 Pedder Street Central, Hong Kong
  • +852 2151 0555
  • Opening hours: Monday–Friday 11–6

Alisan Fine Art

  • Address: 21/F Lyndhurst Tower, 1 Lyndhurst Terrace, Central, Hong Kong
  • Opening hours: Mon-Sat 10:00-18:00  (Closed on Sunday & public holidays)

Admiralty

Asia Society Hong Kong

  • Address: 9, Justice Drive, Admiralty

It is located at the former Explosives Magazine of the old Victoria Barracks.  The rooftop garden provides visitors with an idyllic respite in the heart of the territory’s business hub.  This heritage site has been transformed into a cultural, artistic and intellectual hub where many activities in the form of exhibitions, film screening and performances are organised. Check out the latest activities there by visiting their website.

Lamma Island

This is an outlying island which can be easily reached by ferry from Central.  A half day tour could include a seafood lunch and a walk around the island to see the multi-cultural environment and nature.

Ngong Ping 360

Ngong Ping 360 (cable car ride) and the Big Buddha on Lantau Island– View the natural beauty of Lantau Island and the 34 metres (111 feet 6.5 inches) high Big Buddha while on a 50-minutes round-trip cable car ride.

Kowloon

Tsim Sha Tsui

Enjoy the beautiful night view of the glittering skylines of the Hong Kong Island by taking a leisurely stroll along the harbor-front Promenade.

Wong Tai Sin Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple

Home to three religions (Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism), its natural setting and beautifully ornamented buildings make it as much a scenic attraction as an important religious centre.People come to pray for good fortune or for fortune tellers to give them a glimpse into the future by getting a numbered bamboo stick.

Chi Lin Nunnery and the Nan Lian Garden

Chi Lin Nunnery and the Nan Lian Garden

Experience a large structure renovated in the style of the Tang Dynasty (618-907), its Buddhist treasures, and lotus ponds and a 3.5 hectares (2.5 acres) Garden in which everything has been placed purposefully.

Food

Hong Kong is known for the variety of cuisines around the territory.  Dining out could be fun but quite expensive.  Here are two examples of more affordable places to get a taste of Hong Kong recommended by Bloomberg.

Black Pepper Pork Buns

  • Address: Hing Noodles, Shop J Kok Cheung Street, Tai Kok Tsui, Kowloon

This Shanghai-style noodle joint has a small, no frills dining room. But Hing offers sensational little dumplings, or buns. Two pan-fried black pepper pork buns are HK$24 ($3). Don’t be fooled by their modest appearance: The buns are hot, pan-fried to order and extra juicy with a good hit of spice. For about the same price, you can get the non-spicy pan-fried BBQ pork buns for HK$22.

Wonton Noodles

This cozy, brightly lit noodle place has been around for 60 years. The enduring specialty is the signature wonton noodles: Crinkled, tender dumplings stuffed with shrimp and pork, with eggy ribbon-shaped noodles in a fish-infused broth. A bowl costs about HK$34. Enhance it with a side order of greens.

Other kinds of typical local food:

Dimsum

There are many dimsum restaurants around Hong Kong, ranging from the Michelin Lung King Heen in the Four Seasons to old restaurants such as Lin Heung in Sheung Wan. Most people eat dimsum for lunch, and some old places are open for breakfast, which was how dimsum was traditionally eaten in tea houses around Canton in the last century.

Seafood

A seafood meal could be sumptuous but expensive, with dishes labelled “market price” in the menu. You may want to try a seafood dinner, preferably with a group of friends so you can try a variety of dishes.  Seafood restaurants on the Lamma Island are generally less expensive, so taking half a day off to try a ferry ride and a good meal after seeing an island with many expats is not a bad idea.

Food

Hong Kong is known for the variety of cuisines around the territory.  Dining out could be fun but quite expensive.  Here are two examples of more affordable places to get a taste of Hong Kong recommended by Bloomberg.

Black Pepper Pork Buns

  • Address: Hing Noodles, Shop J Kok Cheung Street, Tai Kok Tsui, Kowloon

This Shanghai-style noodle joint has a small, no frills dining room. But Hing offers sensational little dumplings, or buns. Two pan-fried black pepper pork buns are HK$24 ($3). Don’t be fooled by their modest appearance: The buns are hot, pan-fried to order and extra juicy with a good hit of spice. For about the same price, you can get the non-spicy pan-fried BBQ pork buns for HK$22.

Wonton Noodles

This cozy, brightly lit noodle place has been around for 60 years. The enduring specialty is the signature wonton noodles: Crinkled, tender dumplings stuffed with shrimp and pork, with eggy ribbon-shaped noodles in a fish-infused broth. A bowl costs about HK$34. Enhance it with a side order of greens.

Other kinds of typical local food:

Dimsum

There are many dimsum restaurants around Hong Kong, ranging from the Michelin Lung King Heen in the Four Seasons to old restaurants such as Lin Heung in Sheung Wan. Most people eat dimsum for lunch, and some old places are open for breakfast, which was how dimsum was traditionally eaten in tea houses around Canton in the last century.

Seafood

A seafood meal could be sumptuous but expensive, with dishes labelled “market price” in the menu.You may want to try a seafood dinner, preferably with a group of friends so you can try a variety of dishes.  Seafood restaurants on the Lamma Island are generally less expensive, so taking half a day off to try a ferry ride and a good meal after seeing an island with many expats is not a bad idea.

Banner photo by Steven Wei on Unsplash

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