• Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    February 18, 2020 at 6:31 pm #3478

    How is online teaching going in the different centres? What challenges are you facing and how are you addressing them? What can you share with others in the Hub Community?

    A couple of articles:

    https://qz.com/1800725/the-struggles-of-remote-learning-in-hong-kong-amid-coronavirus/

    https://www.tes.com/news/coronavirus-has-closed-our-school-month

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    February 18, 2020 at 6:49 pm #3480

    At PolyU for my writing classes it’s going fine.  For the research paper I have them in small groups and each group shares articles, discusses (texts) the findings, etc.

    For my speaking classes, it’s still been a bit hard to get my students to show their faces and interact.  They are still kind of shy and reluctant.  But it’s only been 1 class so far, so I’m still strategizing how I can convince them to not be camera shy.  I don’t want to force them but rather persuade them.

    I’ve been using MicroSoft Teams and so far no technical problems.  It has worked pretty well, just the occasional “can’t hear” complaint, but that seems to be issues on the other end.

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    February 18, 2020 at 6:51 pm #3481

    Today I showed a picture of me working on some art … the students seemed to like it and it kind of breaks the ice and hopefully makes the online experience more personable.

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    February 20, 2020 at 10:37 am #3486

    For speaking I divide my student into small groups in MS Teams using the Chat Groups function.  They can then practice with each other… of course they have to turn on their web cam and mic, but the groups are private w teacher access, so it does help them feel less embarrassed.

    Johanna Sandberg
    Johanna Sandberg
    February 24, 2020 at 11:59 am #3493

    What also worked quite well:

    Ending each synchronous 1-hour session with a brief comprehension check focusing on the main LOs and the students’ experience of online teaching. Students respond using emojis, I then call on individual students to elaborate, and ask others to help clarify.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 3, 2020 at 8:49 pm #3523

    In Business English we teach social interactions – the differences between greetings in Germany, France, Japan and Thailand for example.  The coronavirus is changing all this – see Angela Merkel’s non-handshake for example.  Will we see permanent changes in social interaction, or will things get back to normal as memories fade? Will online courtesies be global (e.g. muting your mic when only listening), or will different regions or countries have their own idiosyncrasies?

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    March 9, 2020 at 10:38 am #3548

    Thanks, Johanna!

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 13, 2020 at 9:27 am #3564

    An interesting article.

    Times which Require Greater Care: Ethos in Online Learning

    Jumping into online offerings the way so many universities are wont to do these days is unhealthy for faculty and students alike. That move must be considered, careful, slow, and deliberate.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 13, 2020 at 3:34 pm #3570

    Some good advice about eye care.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 15, 2020 at 8:49 pm #3572

    Some good advice from Graham Stanley – ‘Remote teaching – how to keep learners’ attention’

    https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/remote-teaching-how-keep-learners-attention

    Also, find more ideas in ‘Remote Teaching‘, a collection of articles, research papers and case studies that offer practitioners and policymakers insight into live online language teaching and teacher training.

    https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/innovations-education-remote-teaching

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 18, 2020 at 10:07 am #3582

    Recorded session from the British Council covering these points for Online Teaching:

    • sharing best practices and examples
    • providing scaffolding for teachers to help them prepare for remote teaching
    • what tools are available
    • how to deal with a level of skepticism, or a lack of confidence (about technology) amongst teachers

    Go to this link to see the recording.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 19, 2020 at 4:21 pm #3589

    Some ideas from an ex-colleague (Thanks Janice!)

    These are great as lesson warmers – NYT Picture Prompts: https://www.nytimes.com/column/learning-picture-prompt.

    Teach students to decipher Coronavirus fact from fiction, using the ‘S.I.F.T.’ method (could be good for teaching research skills): https://infodemic.blog/

    Online spinner to add an element of fun (you can enter students’ names): http://www.superteachertools.us/spinner/

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 25, 2020 at 11:44 am #3605

    A reaction from a parent: https://youtu.be/8U6zU4MXmnA 

    Something for teachers to consider.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 29, 2020 at 3:41 pm #3613

    A useful webinar for everyone.

    Teaching online – if the tech fails and structuring lessons

    Ppts are also available under the webinar.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    March 30, 2020 at 12:38 pm #3614

    Six Tips for Teaching Online from Nik Peachey

    https://www.oxfordtefl.com/blog/moving-your-teaching-online-how-do-you-adapt-your-teaching-techniques-for-the-virtual-classroom

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    April 3, 2020 at 11:47 am #3623

    Brilliant, so true!

    Lillian Wong
    Lillian Wong
    April 3, 2020 at 6:05 pm #3624

    Tips to avoid Zoombombing

    Given all the online teaching and virtual social gatherings, it should be no surprise that online “trolls” are taking advantage of this time to hack in and cause trouble. There is now a new word in the English language: Zoombombing — related to “Zoom”.

    Zoombombers are hacking into classes and disrupting learning with inappropriate content shared on screens. I have heard from some one from the US in my TESOL community saying that at her university, they had a half-naked Zoombomber show up to an ESL club meeting — the instructor kicked him out and he came back. The instructor had to shut the class down just before half-naked became naked! This happened because the Zoom link was shared on the Center’s Facebook page.

    Google “Zoombombing” for more information about incidents and precautions you can take. Zoombomb Apocalypse? 😉

    The following message was shared by her from her faculty to secure meetings and classes when using Zoom.  It has some useful tips.  I hope it is helpful.

    —————————-
    Dear colleagues,

    Many of us are now using Zoom to conduct both meetings and classes, and I want to pass along advice for defending against a new form of disruption called “Zoombombing”.

    “Zoombombing” is a new form of trolling in which a participant uses Zoom’s screensharing feature to interrupt and disrupt meetings and classes. Here are some tips for guarding against this.

    Thanks to colleagues elsewhere, here are some tips, presented in recommended priority.

    Don’t post Zoom URLs in public spaces.  Not twitter, not forums, not open.  Share only with meeting attendees.
    Use Advanced Settings to ensure that Who can share? Is set to Host Only.
    Don’t use a Personal Meeting ID for Zoom meetings.  These are easy to find and hack.  The default Zoom Meeting IDs are randomized, and difficult to find and hack.
    Use Require Meeting Password to be doubly careful.  Include the password with the Zoom URL when sending invitations.
    Use the Waiting Room feature to control who enters your Zoom.
    Use Advanced Settings to disable file transfer. (if that is not needed)
    Lock the meeting after it starts.  Look under Participants at the bottom of the Zoom window.  You can lock the door here.”

    Lillian Wong
    Lillian Wong
    April 4, 2020 at 6:29 pm #3628

    A reminder about the value of getting to know our students and to focus on their strengths as we go online.

    From The Chronicle of Higher Education

    What I Am Learning About My Students During an Impossible Semester

     

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    April 14, 2020 at 1:31 pm #3637

    The Difference Between Emergency Remote Teaching and Online Learning

    A relatively easy to read article with some well made points.

    Moving instruction online can enable the flexibility of teaching and learning anywhere, anytime, but the speed with which this move to online instruction is expected to happen is unprecedented and staggering. Although campus support personnel and teams are usually available to help faculty members learn about and implement online learning, these teams typically support a small pool of faculty interested in teaching online. In the present situation, these individuals and teams will not be able to offer the same level of support to all faculty in such a narrow preparation window.

    Instructors and administrators are urged to consider that students might not be able to attend to courses immediately. As a result, asynchronous activities might be more reasonable than synchronous ones. Flexibility with deadlines for assignments within courses, course policies, and institutional policies should be considered.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    April 15, 2020 at 4:20 pm #3638

    LinkedIn has an online course which colleagues might find useful.

    Remote Working: Setting Yourself and Your Teams Up for Success

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    April 17, 2020 at 8:34 am #3651

    A couple of videos from MIT showing how to make very high quality home videos.

    Home Taping Set Up

    Home Taping Recording

     

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    April 21, 2020 at 8:19 pm #3659

    Will online education widen Asia’s digital divide?

    … there are growing concerns that students from less privileged backgrounds, or less well-funded institutions, could be left behind. The financial and digital divide in Asia has become even more apparent now that students are physically removed from campuses and thus from resources such as libraries, computer labs and common spaces.

    Do you see differences in your students depending on their socio-economic background?

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    April 23, 2020 at 2:49 pm #3660

    BBC: The reason Zoom calls drain your energy

    Being on a video call requires more focus than a face-to-face chat, says Petriglieri. Video chats mean we need to work harder to process non-verbal cues like facial expressions, the tone and pitch of the voice, and body language; paying more attention to these consumes a lot of energy. “Our minds are together when our bodies feel we’re not. That dissonance, which causes people to have conflicting feelings, is exhausting. You cannot relax into the conversation naturally,” he says.

     

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    April 28, 2020 at 9:07 am #3677

    FT: A guide to modern manners in the age of Zoom

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    June 11, 2020 at 10:21 am #3776

    Australian universities and job prospects – podcast – an interesting listen.

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    June 14, 2020 at 4:07 pm #3777

    Thanks, Adam.  Loss of jobs in ESOL teaching has already hit America due to stricter immigration policies a few years ago and it’s been compounded by the pandemic and other factors.

    It is my sincere hope that in the future Universities all over the world will re-focus on education (including language support for both native and non-natives) rather than research output.  But, if the systems continue to reward research via funding, promotion, etc. then, unfortunately, language support will continue to wane.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    July 10, 2020 at 7:27 pm #3909

    Unsure about synchronous and asynchronous learning and teaching?

    Here’s an easy to understand article that covers it in detail!

    Synchronous and asynchronous learning

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    July 12, 2020 at 11:08 am #3910

    The International Journal of TESOL Studies has published a special issue on “ELT in the Time of the Coronavirus 2020”. You can find the articles here: https://www.tesolunion.org/journal/lists/folder/8MTEu4NDg5/

    Marshall Yin
    Marshall Yin
    July 15, 2020 at 3:45 pm #3911

    Thanks, Adam!  Good reads.  Yes, hope we keep the momentum!

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    August 20, 2020 at 9:06 pm #3959

    Some weekend readings introduced by a colleague:

    Designing Effective Team Projects in Online Courses (p.8) [FacultyFocus]

    Helpful reminders for managing learners, learning spaces and mechanisms.

    Pedagogy in Times of Disruption: Synchronous vs. Asynchronous? (p.3) [Stanford]

    This is a very concise comparison. It goes to show that probably a hybrid approach is the most sensible way to go.

    How to be a Better Online Teacher (p.11) [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

    Slightly longer read, but sectioning is clear and the content is well worth the time.

    Adam Forrester
    Adam Forrester
    October 21, 2020 at 5:03 pm #4090

    Here’s a great video from Russell Stannard.

    https://youtu.be/bShCWezlfxs

    In the video he has some practical ideas for making Zoom lessons more student-centered.

     

     

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