Pre- & Post-Symposium events

Pre- & Post-Symposium events

Workshop: Using Technology to Foster Student Autonomy

Speaker: Dr. Maggie Sokolik
Time: 10:30 – 12:30
Venue: TBA

Workshop: Analysing your curriculum: An ABC learning design workshop to explore critical thinking in the curriculum

Speaker: Professor Clare Furneaux
Time: 14:30 – 16:30
Venue: TBA

4 June 2019 (Tue)

Workshop: Using Technology to Foster Student Autonomy

Speaker: Dr. Maggie Sokolik
Time: 10:30 – 12:30
Venue: TBA

Abstract:

Effective classrooms require students to exercise a certain degree of autonomy. However, most students in higher education have acquired the skills of learning by being taught. They do not know how to understand their own learning process, set their own goals, compare learning strategies, or assess their success in learning. Similarly, most approaches towards student autonomy look primarily at techniques and activities, such as project-based-learning, and not the underlying mindsets of both instructors and students. In this workshop, we will look at current trends in student autonomy research, and how emerging technologies (adaptive learning/brain-based applications, such as Cerego, or digital participation apps, such as PollEverywhere or SNAPP) can help us surrender more of the power in the classroom and help develop lifelong learning habits in students.

Workshop: Analysing your curriculum: An ABC Learning Design Workshop* to explore critical thinking in the curriculum

Speaker: Professor Clare Furneaux
Time: 14:30 – 16:30
Venue: TBA

Abstract:

ABC Curriculum Design is a rapid-design workshop developed at University College London (UCL), and being used widely in a range of universities to encourage focused course development. In this workshop teams work together to create a visual ‘storyboard’ outlining the type and sequence of learning and assessment activities required to meet a course’s learning outcomes, focusing in this case particularly on critical thinking. The course can include offline and online activities. The session requires you to work with at least one other person to design a teaching module (as a team).

*See http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/abc-ld/

For details of an ABC workshop at my university see:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQiRrVArrlg&feature=youtu.be

Workshop: Developing critical literacy skills

Speaker: Professor Clare Furneaux
Time: 10:30 – 12:30
Venue: TBA

Workshop: Challenges to Assessment

Speaker: Dr. Maggie Sokolik
Time: 14:30 – 16:30
Venue: TBA

6 June 2019 (Thur)

Workshop: Developing critical literacy skills

Speaker: Professor Clare Furneaux
Time: 10:30 – 12:30
Venue: TBA

Abstract:
This workshop will consider how to develop critical literacy skills. We will address reading using an ‘Academic Reading Circles’ approach. The idea of developing literacy skills through reading circles is not new, but the transition to Academic Reading Circles is a more recent development, and teachers such as Tyson Seburn (http://the-round.com/resource/academic-reading-circles/ )have documented this approach to co-construction of meaning around texts. We will explore the development of an ARC activity for undergraduate students, including how this could be used for EAP teachers to approach critical reading skills for discipline-specific as well as general texts.
We will then turn to consider the development of critical writing skills, exploring what students are asked to do in academic writing tasks from different disciplines. This will include analysis of assignment rubrics and discussion of the implications for writing critically in English for Specific Academic Purposes contexts.

Workshop: Challenges to Assessment

Speaker: Dr. Maggie Sokolik
Time: 14:30 – 16:30
Venue: TBA

Abstract:

Writing assessment is often time-consuming, and the outcome is frequently questioned when instructors feel that students don’t read or understand feedback. As a result, instructors don’t see the improvement they hope for in their students’ writing ability. In this workshop, we will look at the research behind different assessment techniques (minimal marking, collaborative rubrics, peer review, portfolio assessment, oral assessment, multimodal assessment) to evaluate which types are best for different writing circumstances. We’ll then use student writing samples with these different assessment types to test our hypotheses about each type’s usefulness.

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